Estonian Beer Review: Saku Koduõlu

Sahti is one of my favorite styles of beer; I’ve always been intrigued by exotic beers with unusual flavors and my career in forestry has made me especially keen to sample beers that use trees as ingredients. My first successful attempt at homebrewing was actually a Sahti inspired Belgian ale, which was quite ambitious for a novice homebrewer to pull off.  As a new brewer, I was overwhelmed by the creative possibilities of brewing and reached for the stars and decided to combine, juniper, honey, orange zest, coriander and Wyeast’s Forbidden Fruit ale yeast into a double strength concoction that would be used to ring in the end of skis season and the start of spring.  Instead of landing amongst the stars, I probably landed on the moon, but for my second batch of beer I was thrilled and the positive feedback kept me coming back for more.

So naturally being in the Baltic I’ve kept my eye open for examples of this style.  I’m pleased to report that while not ubiquitous, Sahti brewing is alive and well both in Finland and Estonia.  I recently sampled a fine commercial example of the style from Estonia, Koduõlu.

IMG_7638

mmmmm! Sahti! Terviseks!

The name Koduõlu mean literally homebrew.  True to style its hazy, with lots of sediment and big bite of juniper. While Finland gets all the credit for this style its actually a shared style brewed in Finland, the Swedish Island of Gotland and the Estonian island of Saaremaa. In all three areas beers were traditionally brewed with rye and barley,  because of the primitive sparging techniques and difficulties in mashing rye, brewers traditionally filtered their wort with juniper boughs giving this style one of its most unique characteristics.  Juniper also gives the beer a nice bitterness and eliminates the need for hops. I had long thought this was because hops couldn’t grow in such a cold and inhospitable climate as Finland, but a resent trip to Finland proved my assumptions wrong.  They actually can grow quite well in Finland, up to 20cm per day!  So the lack of hops in this style doesn’t reflect the inability to grow hops so much as the tradition of using more ancient brewing techniques used to make gruit.

Now on to the review!

Appearance-Deep orange, very hazy with a thick off-white head with good retention, plenty of yeast sediment in the bottle to swirl and add or leave alone depending on your preference

Smell-Slightly spicy with hints of alcohol and clove, some peachy esters

Taste-Mild fruity sweetness upfront, esters reminiscent of oranges, balanced by woody tannins from juniper with a dry and slightly mineral finish.

Mouthfeel– Medium to full bodied with medium low carbonation.

Overall-This beer is actually a very tame and approachable example of this style geared for a commercial market.  Nevertheless, this beer hasn’t been dumbed down in anyway, and came be thought of as a Sahti gateway beer; opening the drinkers world up to new and even more exotic examples of this quixotic style.  Highly recommended